Tag Archives: Functional Neurological Symptoms

sick.note-section-header TW13

Functional Movement Disorder :: #2.1 – Exploring the Symptoms

This post is part of a series discussing functional movement disorder.

A ‘functional movement disorder’ means that there is abnormal movement or positioning of part of the body due to the nervous system not working properly (but not due to an underlying neurological disease).

In plain English: there is a problem with the way your brain is sending messages to, and receiving messages from, your body about movement.

The disorder is also sometimes called Functional Neurological Disorder, Functional Neurological Symptoms or Dissociative Neurological Symptoms.

 
I had a hard time explaining what was happening to my body to friends, family and medical professionals. And until they saw the symptoms for themselves, they had a hard time understanding what I meant.

This post will continue taking a more detailed examination of what the symptoms actually look like: particularly pain, facial spasm and speech problems..
 
 
PLEASE NOTE: Your symptoms may be similar or different to mine. What I have done is focus on the main issue areas and explained them in terms of my personal experience: in the hope that giving you concrete examples will help you in understanding what may be happening with your body.
Continue reading Functional Movement Disorder :: #2.1 – Exploring the Symptoms

sick.note-section-header TW13

Functional Movement Disorder :: #2 – Exploring the Symptoms

This post is part of a series discussing functional movement disorder.

A ‘functional movement disorder’ means that there is abnormal movement or positioning of part of the body due to the nervous system not working properly (but not due to an underlying neurological disease).

In plain English: there is a problem with the way your brain is sending messages to, and receiving messages from, your body about movement.

The disorder is also sometimes called Functional Neurological Disorder, Functional Neurological Symptoms or Dissociative Neurological Symptoms.

 
Following the introductory post explaining what functional movement disorders are and considering what to do when your symptoms manifest, I thought it might be useful to take a look at the symptoms themselves.

I had a hard time explaining what was happening to my body to friends, family and medical professionals. And until they saw the symptoms for themselves, they had a hard time understanding what I meant.

Therefore in this post, I shall be taking a more detailed examination of what the symptoms actually look like: particularly weakness & paralysis, tremor & spasm, contractures and gait problems.
Continue reading Functional Movement Disorder :: #2 – Exploring the Symptoms

sick.note-section-header TW13

Functional Movement Disorder :: #1 – What Is It?

So you think you may have a movement disorder?

chronic illness ecard 6 
I’ve been thinking about the best way to tell you about what it’s like to have a Functional Movement Disorder – as discussed in last Friday’s post.

In truth, just writing about what my physical self and I go through hasn’t been easy. So I’ve decided to approach this from a more practical standpoint.

I’m going to publish a series of posts that follow the progression of my illness, so that you get an idea of what happened/happens. Within that, will be anecdotes about my experience, the different symptoms that arose and some pointers about what was done in response to what happened.

Hopefully, this format will be more helpful to anyone who is going through similar – or knows of someone who is. And I will share our learning so that you don’t have to reinvent the wheel – which hopefully means that you can get to support services more promptly to help you manage your illness.

This week, I’ll be focusing on what to do when your symptoms first manifest.
Continue reading Functional Movement Disorder :: #1 – What Is It?

The Stink of Chronic Illness

Caution - out of order

Hello. I am ‘might war’ and I am a functional movement disorder sufferer.

 
Just give me a minute. Seeing the words down on paper tends to steal my breath. Why? Because those words just do not do justice to the experience of living with such a condition.

My life has changed beyond all recognition. I’ve had to adjust to the fact that my body is no longer under my control. I now travel by wheelchair.

Basically, I am broken.

And I am pissed off about it.

Continue reading The Stink of Chronic Illness

and-sh!t-section-header TW13

A Person, A Place, A Thing

The female lies slumped on the floor in a clumsy imitation of the recovery position. Dressed in an orange and black tiger print onesie of worn fleece with a rip in the left heel, her face is obscured by thick twists of black hair generously traced with ribbons of grey whose dripping ends flutter against the tensed jaw and rounded lips curling slightly away from even, gritted teeth through which passes a low, strangled, keening sound: its muted timbre and erratic rhythms reminiscent of chanting. Rounded shoulders push out the right arm at an awkward angle, highlighting the only visible hand with its ashen skin where multiple swellings push bloated surface into shiny, smooth peaks; and pulse as though on the cusp of bursting.
Continue reading A Person, A Place, A Thing

Officially Sick

expressive sculpture of a female 
 
Good news, Ladies and Gentlemen.

might war is OFFICIALLY sick.

After 701 days of being unwell, I have been seen by the specialist doctor at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery; and we now finally know what is wrong.
Continue reading Officially Sick

If Your Universe Has No Moon …

“Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps; for he is the only animal that is struck by the difference between what things are and what they might have been.”
– William Hazlitt

Continue reading If Your Universe Has No Moon …

Retirement 101

65

used to be the default retirement age in the UK, but this has been phased out and most people can now work for as long as they want to. However, 65 is generally what people still consider to be the retirement age.

According to the Cambridge dictionary, retirement is “when you leave your job and stop working, usually because you are old” or “the period in someone’s life after they have stopped working because they reached a particular age”. No matter where I look to research the subject, I am surrounded by images of older people living it large. Yeah, retirement is really associated with age.
Continue reading Retirement 101